Saturday, April 30, 2005

That's It! - 0 comments

That's all, folks: thirty days, thirty drawings. If you're just tuning in, you can see the full set in the Archive.

Day Thirty - 0 comments

Friday, April 29, 2005

Day Twenty-nine - 0 comments

Thursday, April 28, 2005

Day Twenty-eight - 0 comments

Wednesday, April 27, 2005

Day Twenty-seven - 0 comments

Tuesday, April 26, 2005

Day Twenty-six - 0 comments

Monday, April 25, 2005

Day Twenty-five - 0 comments

Sunday, April 24, 2005

Day Twenty-four - 0 comments

Saturday, April 23, 2005

Day Twenty-three - 0 comments

Friday, April 22, 2005

Day Twenty-two - 1 comments

Thursday, April 21, 2005

Day Twenty-one - 0 comments

Wednesday, April 20, 2005

Day Twenty - 0 comments

Tuesday, April 19, 2005

Day Nineteen - 0 comments

Monday, April 18, 2005

Day Eighteen - 0 comments

Sunday, April 17, 2005

Day Seventeen - 0 comments

Saturday, April 16, 2005

Day Sixteen - 0 comments

Friday, April 15, 2005

Day Fifteen - 0 comments

Thursday, April 14, 2005

Day Fourteen - 0 comments

Wednesday, April 13, 2005

Day Thirteen - 0 comments

Tuesday, April 12, 2005

Day Twelve - 1 comments

Monday, April 11, 2005

Day Eleven - 0 comments

Sunday, April 10, 2005

Day Ten - 0 comments

Saturday, April 9, 2005

Day Nine - 0 comments

Friday, April 8, 2005

Day Eight - 0 comments

Thursday, April 7, 2005

Day Seven - 0 comments

Wednesday, April 6, 2005

Day Six - 0 comments

Tuesday, April 5, 2005

Day Five - 0 comments

Monday, April 4, 2005

Day Four - 0 comments

Sunday, April 3, 2005

Day Three - 0 comments

Saturday, April 2, 2005

Day Two - 0 comments

Friday, April 1, 2005

Day One - 0 comments

Thirty Days of Friedrich: An Explanation - 0 comments


At first an exercise, later a fixation: one drawing each day inspired by Anton Graff's monumental portrait of Friedrich der Grosse.

Each drawing was begun as a blind contour (a drawing exercise using one continuous line, without lifting the pen or looking down at the page) and finished as I saw fit. The inconstancies of this method are useful both as a drawing exercise, and to create freer lines than a more analytic style might be capable of.

My sincerest apologies to Anton Graff for my wanton abuse of his work.